October 2, 2019

Wednesday 02 October, 12.30-15.05, Room Berlin

Presenting the results of seven cutting-edge clinical trials

 

With seven scientific trials presented for the first time, this highly anticipated Hot Topics session is sure to generate some discussion across the field. Papers from several trials in this session will be simultaneously published in major medical journals and results have been embargoed until the session begins…

Be among those who hear this research first, and don’t miss the chance to ask the speakers questions directly on site about their pivotal trials!

 

HOT TOPICS – moderated by J Kesecioglu (Utrecht, Netherlands) & H Bauchner (Boston, USA) – to include:  

  • RCT of vitamin C for sepsis – presented by A. A. Fowler (Richmond, USA) – Read the articleWatch the presentation on E-LIVES
  • RCT of selepressin for sepsis – presented by P.-F. Laterre (Brussels, Belgium) –  Read the article –  Watch the presentation on E-LIVES
  • Targeted temperature management at 33°C versus 37°C after non-shockable cardiac arrest: the HYPERION randomized clinical trial – presented by J. B. Lascarrou (Nantes, France) – Watch the presentation on E-LIVES
  • High-Flow Nasal Oxygen with Non-Invasive Ventilation vs. High-Flow Nasal Oxygen Alone Immediately After Extubation in the Intensive Care Unit: The HIGH-WEAN Randomized Clinical Trial – presented by A. Thille (Poitiers, France) – Read the articleWatch the presentation on E-LIVES
  • Changes in end-of-life practices in European intensive care units from 1999 to 2016 – presented by C. L. Sprung (Jerusalem, Israel) – Read the articleNo recording available
  • Early Oseltamivir therapy improves survival in critically ill patients with severe influenza infection – presented by G. Moreno (Tarragona, Spain) – Watch the presentation on E-LIVES
  • Increased risk of dying if discharged with inter-hospital transfer due to lack of ICU beds. A nationwide study from the Swedish Intensive Care Registry – presented by F. Parenmark (Gävle, Sweden) – Watch the presentation on E-LIVES

 

RCT of vitamin C for sepsis – presented by A. A. Fowler (Richmond, USA)

Professor Alpha A Fowler is a practicing pulmonary disease specialist and Chairman of the Division of Pulmonary Disease and Critical Care Medicine and Professor of Medicine at the Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, Richmond (USA).

We have been studying vitamin C as a therapy for sepsis and acute lung injury for more than 10 years. After a great deal of pre-clinical work and a small phase I safety trial, where we found intravenous vitamin C to be safe to infuse into critically ill patients, we conducted a National Institutes of Health funded multi-center randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled trial administering intravenous vitamin C in patients with sepsis-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome.

Intravenous vitamin C was found to be highly effective at preventing mortality by Day 28. Patients who received vitamin C had significantly increased ICU-free days at Day 28 and significantly increased hospital-free days at Day 60.


Full presentation will be available shortly after the Hot Topics session.

 

Dr Fowler, Pulmonologist and Intensivist from Virginia, discusses the scientific background behind a soon to be published trial testing vitamin C in sepsis

 


 

Targeted temperature management at 33°C versus 37°C after non-shockable cardiac arrest: the HYPERION randomized clinical trial – presented by J. B. Lascarrou (Nantes, France)

Dr Lascarrou is a full-time practitioner at the medical intensive care unit of the University Hospital Centre in Nantes, France. Dr Lascarrou received his medical degree from the University of Nantes, University Hospital Centre. He conducts several retrospective or prospective trials in the area of cardiac arrest, and especially therapeutic hypothermia or targeted temperature management.

He has been member of the French Intensive Care Society (FICS/SRLF) since 2008 and of the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine (ERC) since 2018. He is also a member of the AfterROSC Network (https://afterrosc.org/) on cardiac arrest and of the Clinical Research in Intensive Care and Sepsis (https://www.triggersep.org/).

HYPERION was an open-label randomized controlled trial comparing moderate therapeutic hypothermia (33°C during the first 24 hours) to targeted normothermia (37°C) in comatose patients admitted to intensive care units after resuscitation from cardiac arrest with non-shockable rhythm.

The primary outcome was survival with a favourable neurological outcome, assessed on post-randomization day 90 using the CPC scale.

A favorable neurological outcome was defined as CPC 1 or 2.

Between January 2014 and January 2018, 584 patients were included and the trial’s results will be released at ESICM 2019 during the Hot Topic session.

Full presentation will be available shortly after the Hot Topics session.

 

Dr Jean Baptiste Lascarrou, Intensivist and researcher from Paris, discusses the HYPERION trial comparing 33 and 37 in cardiac arrest

 


 

Changes in end-of-life practices in European intensive care units from 1999 to 2016 – presented by C. L. Sprung (Jerusalem, Israel)

Professor Charles Sprung is Director of the General Intensive Care Unit in the Department of Anaesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine at the Hadassha Hebrew University Medical Center, Jerusalem, where he is also Director of the Institute of Medicine, Ethics and Law.

Charles was trained in Medicine at SUNY – Downstate Medical Center and Kings County Medical Center, in Brooklyn, New York.  His major interests are sepsis, septic shock, pulmonary edema and ARDS, pulmonary artery catheterization, blast injury and ethical issues, including end of life, triage and mass disasters.

He has coordinated several prospective, multicenter European studies, including Corticus (corticosteroids in septic shock), Ethicus (End of Life Decision Making and Procedures in European Intensive Care Units), Ethicatt  (Systematic Study of General Ethical Principles Involved in End of Life Decisions for Patients in European Intensive Care Units) and Eldicus (Triage Decision Making for the Elderly in European Intensive Care units).

The Ethicus-2 study was a prospective, observational study of 22 European ICUs that were previously included in the Ethicus-1 study conducted from 1999-2000. During a self-selected continuous six-month period at each ICU, consecutive patients who died or had any limitation of life-sustaining therapy from September 2015 until October 2016 were included. Patients were followed until death or two months from the first treatment limitation decision.

Full presentation will be available shortly after the Hot Topics session.

 

 


 

Increased risk of dying if discharged with inter-hospital transfer due to lack of ICU beds. A nationwide study from the Swedish Intensive Care Registry – presented by F. Parenmark (Gävle, Sweden)

Dr Parenmark is working as a Senior Consultant in anaesthesia and intensive care medicine at Gävle Hospital, Sweden.   He is currently undertaking doctoral studies at the University of Linköping and the Centre for Research and Development at the Uppsala University, Gävleborg Region, Sweden. Read his article about “reducing night-time discharge from intensive care“.

In Sweden, inter-hospital transfers due to lack of resources are associated with a 24% increased risk of dying within 30 days post transfer compared to those transferred due to other causes. The risk lingers on beyond 6 months and is adjusted for different patient characteristics and severity of illness.

Full presentation will be available shortly after the Hot Topics session.

 

Dr Frederick Parenmark from Sweden discusses the impact of non-clinical transfers on ICU mortality, based on soon-to-be pubished registry data

 


 

Watch the full session on ESICM Live TV starting Wednesday at 12:30.

#LIVES2019 #ICU 

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