May 3, 2019

ICM journal - Articles of the month

Articles of the month with reviews – selected from the April issue

 

ORIGINAL ~  Nasal high-flow preoxygenation for endotracheal intubation in the critically ill patient : a randomised clinical trial.

Christophe Guitton, Stephan Ehrmann, Christelle Volteau, Gwenhael Colin, Adel Maamar, Vanessa Jean-Michel, Pierre-Joachim Mahe, Mickael Landais, Noelle Brule, Cedric Bretonnière, Olivier Zambon, Mickael Vourc’h : Nasal high-flow preoxygenation for endotracheal intubation in the critically ill patient: a randomised clinical trial

This is the first randomised multicentre study comparing the use of HFNC with HFFM for the preoxygenation of non-severely hypoxemic patients in the ICU.  In this setting, preoxygenation with HFNC could be considered as a valuable device to reduce intubation-related complications

> ARTICLE REVIEW

 

ORIGINAL ~ Fever control in critically ill adults. An individual patient data meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials.

Paul J. Young, Rinaldo Bellomo, Gordon R. Bernard, Daniel J. Niven, Frederique Schortgen, Manoj Saxena, Richard Beasley, Mark Weatherall : Fever control in critically ill adults.  An individual patient data meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials

An individual level patient data meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials was conducted to compare the outcomes of ICU patients who received more active fever management with the outcomes of patients who received less active fever management.  The findings do not support the hypothesis that more active fever management increases survival compared with less active fever management overall, or in patients with limited physiological reserves.

> ARTICLE REVIEW

 

ORIGINAL ~ Structural differences in the diaphragm of patients following controlled vs. assisted and spontaneous mechanical ventilation.

J. Marin-Corral, I. Dot, M. Boguña, L. Cecchini, A. Zapatero, M. P. Gracia, S. Pascual-Guardia, C. Vilà, A. Castellví, P. Pérez-Terán, J. Gea, J. R. Masclans : Structural differences in the diaphragm of patients following controlled vs. assisted and spontaneous mechanical ventilation 

Maastricht III donors present less Ventilator-Induced Diaphragm Damage (VIDD) than brain-dead donors, probably due to their ability to stimulate their diaphragm.  In this regard, the authors recommend that the period of controlled mechanical ventilation in critically ill ventilated patients should be kept short and that ventilation modes with sustained patient effort should be introduced promptly.

> ARTICLE REVIEW

 

More quality research and manuscripts in the ICM journal here.

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